HORSESHOE BEND 3 © 2013
Arizona

There is an amazing view of the Colorado River wrapping itself around Horseshoe Bend in Glen Canyon that I was eager to capture. This geological masterpiece is an example of what happens when water follows the path of least resistance. As I worked on getting the best angle, Niki was a nervous wreck. The problem was that in order to get the whole river at the bottom of the canyon in the photograph, I had to get to the edge. As I inched closer and closer to the edge of the cliff, Niki started yelling at me, saying, “No photograph is worth your life!” It wasn’t easy, but it sure was beautiful. This photograph is printed on a large format Epson printer using genuine Epson ink and archival Harman Hahnemuhle paper. Each photograph is digitally signed, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. This is a limited edition series and each photograph is numbered.

GRAND CANYON MOONRISE 2 © 2011
Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park is such a fantastic place! Throughout the day, shadows crawl across the canyon, creating a multitude of different images. A person could spend their life photographing nothing but the canyon and never shoot the same scene. Niki and I arrived at the canyon in January for a week of photography, hoping to find at least a dusting of snow; alas, there was none to be found. We hiked all over the south rim and enjoyed ourselves tremendously despite the frigid temperatures. On this particular day, we were surprised by a full moon rising over the edge of the canyon. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

GLACIER POINT HALF DOME © 2009
Yosemite National Park, CA

As Niki and I sat at Glacier Point in Yosemite, waiting for the fog to lift off Half Dome, we reminisced about our adventures in Yosemite when we were young. This sacred place is where I asked Niki to marry me, and now, more than 50 years later, the magnificence of Yosemite is still here. There is something reassuring about the enduring beauty of the wild. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

BRISTLECONE PINE 2 © 2011
White Mountains, CA

I photographed the Bristlecone Pines in January and when we finally reached the altitude of 10,000+ I was surprised to find there was no snow in the White Mountains. Although this wasn’t good news for California’s drought, it was good news to me. The lack of snow made photographing the pines easier and a lot more fun. For a long time I had wanted to photograph the pines, so it was a pure joy to capture images of these magnificent pieces of natural sculpture. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

WHILDEN’S POND 4 © 2002
Big Cypress Gallery

During the winter, so many birds visit the pond, it’s like having the Discovery Channel outside the cottage window. Achieving the correct exposure to photograph birds with a large format camera is difficult, so I set up Niki’s Pentax 6×7″ camera, with a 1200mm lens, in a position where I would only have to open the window to take a photograph. My ideal way of shooting birds is from our sunroom . . . in air conditioning. The Great Egret The great egret stands in stark contrast to most of its wetland habitat with its jet-black legs, keen yellow eyes, regal pose, and suit of brilliant white feathers. There are 17 wading bird species in the Everglades, and each has a unique method of capturing food. A great egret stands still atop a branch or walks stealthily through shallow waters searching for fish, frogs, freshwater eels, and even young snakes and alligators. When it finds its prey, the egret delivers a deadly jab with its dagger-like bill. When surrounding wet prairies have dried up, and fish have retreated to the only remaining water holes, ponds such as this become opportune vistas for observing wildlife and their distinctive behavioral patterns. Whilden’s Pond 4 was taken with a Pentax 6×7 camera on Ilford XP2 film. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Camera settings f/22 | 1200mm Takumar lens| 1/4 second Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

WHILDEN’S POND 1 © 2002
Big Cypress Gallery

We named our backyard pond Whilden’s Pond in honor of the man who owned the property before us, Leon Whilden. He was a hermit who lived in Big Cypress and turned the property into an orchid and exotic plant nursery. During the winter, so many birds spend time in our pond that it’s like having the Discovery Channel right outside the swamp cottage window! Watching all of the birds made me long to photograph them; however, capturing them with a large format camera is nearly impossible because of the slow shutter speeds. Generally, animals don’t wait around to have their photo taken. I resolved my dilemma by using Niki’s 6×7 Pentax camera with a 1200mm lens. I was working downstairs when I looked outside and saw a beautiful egret standing majestically on a log in our pond. I ran upstairs to where I had Niki’s camera all set up and waiting, then very slowly opened the window so I wouldn’t scare the bird, and took the photograph. So, I tell folks that my bird photography is done in the comfort of my own air-conditioned home…I just open the window and take the photograph! This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

THREE SISTERS SPRING © 1995
Crystal River, FL

At the time I photographed Three Sisters Springs it was privately owned and only used occasionally for family picnics. The manatees had it all to themselves. I feel fortunate to have photographed it in the lonely, wild and natural way it was meant to be. Since that time the springs have been acquired by the state and opened to the public; however, there are restrictions on when people can access the springs. During the winter, manatees congregate in large numbers in the springs due to the warm water. During that time the springs are closed to humans. The Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge is a critical protection for the West Indian Manatee. There are about 30 known springs in the area and with their constant 72-degree water, they provide an essential warm water refuge for manatees that congregate there in the winter months. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

ST. VINCENT ISLAND DRIFTWOOD © 2005
Florida Panhandle

St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, Florida – While working on the PBS documentary about the Apalachicola River with Elam Stoltzfus and the Live Oak Production Group, I took a break and visited some offshore islands. St. Vincent Island is a National Wildlife Refuge. It is an undeveloped island and a wonder to visit. I only had a couple of days to spend photographing the island, but I could have stayed a long, long time. When I found this beautiful piece of driftwood with so much texture on it I couldn’t resist photographing the beauty of it. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

SHELL KEY 3 © 2001
Florida Bay

When I saw this mangrove sitting all alone surrounded by crystal clear water, the simplicity of the image attracted me to the scene. The transparency of the water accentuates the importance of clean water to the Florida Keys. We have a beautiful heritage in the water surrounding the Florida Keys, let’s keep it that way for future generations. Origin of the Florida Keys Off the southeast coast of Peninsular Florida, there are over 800 small charted islands whose origins are in the sea itself and the life it supports! Ancient sand shoals on the bottom of the ocean floor were believed to have created the shallow warm water conditions conducive to the growth of abundant corals and other calcium carbonate-forming sea inhabitants. Coral developed into dense reefs, like thick thriving underwater forests reaching from 10–18 feet in height. Over thousands of years, other marine organisms contributed to the seafloor as their skeletal remains and organic secretions accumulated. As sea level slowly receded during the last ice age, both coral and accumulated marine sediments became exposed and formed the Florida Keys. This photograph is hand-printed in Clyde’s darkroom on fiber-based paper, selenium toned, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. The photograph is a limited edition and signed by Clyde. Disclaimer – Cropping, contrast, and image density may vary. To learn more about the darkroom printing process, click here.

MYAKKA FLOWERS © 2014
Myakka River State Park, Sarasota

During the spring, flowers fill Myakka State Park. As I walked along the trails lined with flowers I felt like I was on my way to heaven. I had always wanted to photograph this period of time in Myakka, but my schedule didn’t coordinate with my desire. Finally, I got the chance and grabbed it. I had a great time taking many photographs of the fields filled with flowers. This photograph is printed on a large format Epson printer using genuine Epson ink and archival Harman Hahnemuhle paper. Each photograph is digitally signed, then mounted and matted to current archival standards. This is a limited edition series and each photograph is numbered.